Princess Of Mars

Princess Of Mars DVD und Blu-ray

Während sich der US-Soldat John Carter in Arizona aufhält, findet er sich unerklärlicherweise plötzlich auf dem Mars wieder. Schon bald bemerkt Carter, dass er dort über übermenschliche Kräfte verfügt. Er gewinnt den Respekt der Tharks, eines. Princess of Mars ist ein US-amerikanischer Science-Fiction-Film aus dem Jahr Regie führte Mark Atkins, der auch das Drehbuch schrieb. Der Film basiert​. folgte die erste Buchausgabe mit dem Titel „A Princess of Mars“. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Inhalt; 2 Deutsche Veröffentlichungen; 3. Buy A Princess of Mars (Penguin Classics) by Burroughs, Edgar Rice from Amazon's Fiction Books Store. Everyday low prices on a huge range of new releases. Princess of Mars. 1 sa. 33 dk+. Während sich der US-Soldat John Carter in Arizona aufhält, findet er sich unerklärlicherweise plötzlich auf dem Mars.

Princess Of Mars

Mar 18, - A Princess of Mars () German Die Prinzessin vom Mars. By Edgar Rice Burroughs. (Germany: Kranichborn, ) Cover art by Joe Jusko. exploremor.co: Doppel-BD: Supernova & Princess of Mars: Movies & TV. Während sich der US-Soldat John Carter in Arizona aufhält, findet er sich unerklärlicherweise plötzlich auf dem Mars wieder. Schon bald bemerkt Carter, dass er dort über übermenschliche Kräfte verfügt. Er gewinnt den Respekt der Tharks, eines.

Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews.

Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. When a solider in the middle east gets wounded in the line of duty, he is teleported to the planet Barsoom.

There, he must face the hostile aliens to fight for his survival again. Director: Mark Atkins. Stars: Antonio Sabato Jr. Added to Watchlist.

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John Carter Traci Lords Dejah Thoris Matt Lasky Tars Tarkas Chacko Vadaketh Tal Hajus Noelle Perris Sola Matt Lagan Kantos Kan Kimberly Ables Jindra Saroh Kan Tomas Boykin Cornwell Sams Rob Ullett Hudson Dean Kreyling Atol Nard Mohammad Kavianpour Hosan Jay Beyers Thark Gordack Ali Tagi Alexander Jamal Jonathan Footman People flee.

Friends help friends. Baddies behave badly. No one really changes much. Oh, they rise in rank and esteem, and prove their mettle, and some character is revealed in time, but really, nothing is told about these people that we did not know very early on.

There is silliness and many shortcuts are taken. ERB makes use of deus ex machina so much he must have had a mechanic on call.

Carter learns that a large amount of Martian communications occurs via telepathy and bingo, he is telepathic too.

What luck! Also, Martian language has devolved to mostly a single tongue. No, really. And he learns it in a twinkling, with the help of a kindly female Thark named Sola.

Whenever someone needs a rescue there is always a rescuer, either now or eventually. The cavalry comes riding over the hill a bit too often to avoid eye-rolling.

The fights are pretty much pro-forma, with almost mandatory nods to the honor and skill of the thousands of opponents, after, of course, Carter knocks them out or kills them with a single blow to the chin.

In between, Burroughs offers bits and pieces of his vision of life on Mars. We learn how Thark children are joined with parents, get some info on Barsoomian visions of death and afterlife, consider a bit the problem of scarce air, and may wonder at the ancient human ruins now occupied by other species.

They have some nifty tech on Barsoom as well, having discovered a special 9th ray of light that is used for energy. Radium is a useful power source as well.

Airships of all sizes speed about, but seem to function mostly as boats with negative draft. There will be swashbuckling. There are some elements in the book that do not travel well through the years.

The women have some wonderful qualities but there is little e-quality to be found. Also, slavery is still a very active element of Martian society, and while ERB shows sundry characters shackled to those chains, and does his best to free those, he does not seem all that upset about the institution.

In one commentary on communistic elements of Tharkian society, ERB notes Owning everything in common, even to your women and children, has resulted in your owning nothing in common.

This was published in , so a quote like this might not have stuck out so much back then. Of course there are many much more ancient items that seem quaint today, such as You shall not covet your neighbor's wife, or his manservant, or his maidservant, or his ox, or his ass, or anything that is your neighbor's.

I guess ownership is in the eye of the beholder. Social systems seem to be widely of the royal persuasion, although combat figures large in determining leadership in some groups.

And just as girls have been led to hope for a prince to come to the rescue, so here our hero is not panting after any ordinary female.

Dejah is a bona fide , card-carrying princess. Then, there are some elements that might stand up rather well.

Carter applies his knowledge of animals to persuade the locals to treat their beasties much better. The moral superiority of races is not at all determined by color, or in this case, even sentient species.

Honesty, motherhood, and I am certain that if the ingredients grew there, apple pie would come in for some ERB support. Courage is also a highly valued trait.

Physical prowess in battle is paramount here. Frank Schoonover's cover illustration for the first book version-from Wikipedia Ok, so bottom line.

This is a very dated book. It is, after all, one hundred years old. It contains antiquated, sometimes offensive notions.

Many of the characters are pretty thinly drawn. But this was not intended to be a thoughtful, adult novel.

It is pulp fiction, literally, as Barsoom made its first public appearance in All-Story Magazine in , and its focus is on three things, action, action and action.

Overall, good fun. It helps to be a ten-year-old boy. Look at those cavemen go. Put those binoculars away NOW. Coverage in the latest issue includes a whole passel of things Martian.

View all 50 comments. Mar 25, Lyn rated it liked it. A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs was not the book that transformed Burroughs into a publishing success, that honor belongs to Tarzan of the Apes.

However, this was the book, published in that effectively began a career that would change the face of American literature in various genres from then on.

The stamp of Burroughs influence can be seen in the works of Heinlein, Clarke, Bradbury and countless others as well as film and television.

Flash Gordon used the Barsoom series as a template and Star Wars was heavily influenced in turn by the Flash Gordon serial.

From the humble origins of pulp magazines came a rich series of adventure, romance and swashbuckling good fun.

This is the story of how John Carter was mysteriously transported to Mars and how he then engaged in one superhuman adventure after another.

Not much message or provocative literature here, just a well written good narrative. View all 21 comments. Aug 08, Evgeny rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy.

The books is full of familiar cliches: it created most of them. I am also having a great trouble between classifying this book between fantasy and scifi.

As I am not the only one with such problem a new genre was created dubbed "sword and planet". Coming back to the plot, an American Civil War veteran and a perfect southern gentleman he calls himself thus, so who am I to call him differently?

John Carter ended up on Mars, of all places - straight from an Arizona desert, minus all his cloths.

P The books is full of familiar cliches: it created most of them. Practically upon his arrival he became a prisoner of large war-loving Martians.

Being best at everything he puts his mind to, he beat one of the most obnoxious aliens and gained some measure of respect. Numerous adventures including romantic ones follow.

Speaking about romance I kept recalling an old saying "If you must fall in love, fall in love with a queen" - because this is exactly what John Carted did see the title.

I told you, the guy was perfect. This thing - him being perfect - is the only significant complaint I can make.

At least when it comes to him being stronger than larger Martians there was an explanation scientific enough for me to accept: the difference in gravitational fields between good old Earth and red Mars means earthlings must have stronger bones and muscles.

The writing quality is mostly very good, the story is never boring. This is the second best known series of the King of Pulp Fiction; the best known series of him is so famous the main character grew out of his books to live an independent life.

I am talking about Tarzan obviously. So this is a classic book, it passed a test of time, is still very entertaining and very influential.

Four stars despite my grumblings above. Please ignore recent pitiful attempt by Disney to make a movie out of it. They failed miserably.

View all 12 comments. Old-school pulpy goodness. Fun classic full of manly adventures and good cheesy romance between an awesomely manly man John Carter did I mention manly?

And let's not forget John Carter's favorite Barsoomian "dog" Woola. Who in my head, thanks to the otherwise forgettable movie, will always look like this insanely adorable menacing monster-cutie - SQ Old-school pulpy goodness.

What's not to love about Burroughs' classic? Well, yeah, it's chock-full of machismo, with a generous helping of sexism, a touch of colonialism attitude, a bit of stereotyping, and with mostly wooden characters Doesn't it sound awful?

I kid, I kid, Barsoom fans. I actually enjoyed this book, believe it or not. I mean, we get a dying red planet, an atmosphere plant!

A Princess of Mars may not always appeal to the modern reader thanks to changing values in the last hundred years! Burroughs' portrayal of Mars Barsoom is pretty awesome, the adventures are fun, and the pacing is good.

Ahhhh, John Carter Your story may be neither deep nor profound, but it's an entertaining classic, and I still love you. View all 41 comments.

Jun 17, Jason Koivu rated it it was ok Shelves: fiction , sci-fi. I'm not saying I didn't like it, but what in the hell was that?! A Princess of Mars is a forerunner in the sci-fi genre and as many of them suffer from ignorant science, so suffers this one.

Modes of transportation are silly, alien races are simplistic at best, etc etc I know I'm nitpicking. On the other hand, one has to be impressed with the guesswork a fictional novelist made regarding living conditions on another planet I'm not saying I didn't like it, but what in the hell was that?!

On the other hand, one has to be impressed with the guesswork a fictional novelist made regarding living conditions on another planet, considering he was writing at a time prior to space exploration.

Hell, this was written a mere nine years after the first flight by man. The real reason this didn't resonate with me had to do with the story's hero, John Carter.

He's just too good at everything to be interesting. The writing also suffers from stiff formality.

The rigidity of the language Burroughs' used lacked elegance and deflated exciting action scenes.

However, there was plenty of action and that alone kept me turning pages. All the same, the errors mounted.

Burroughs made the mistake of giving the game away. Use of the diary style of narration is a technique in fiction that should never have happened.

If the hero of the story is writing about his adventures ten, twenty, whatever number of years after it all went down, it completely gives away the fact that he lived to tell the tale and thus takes the wind out of tension's sails.

Present tense for action, always present tense! John Carter arrives there nekkid! John Carter is transported to Barsoom from Frontier America directly after a bloody conflict with the dread and savage Red Man in this case, the Apache Green Men do not believe in love or friendship or marriage or parenthood.

The Princes of Mars in question is a two-dimensional creation: in love with John Carter except for those predictable moments when predictable misunderstandings occur, a Red Princess of the city-state Helium, beautiful, haughty, brave, a woman of her word, etc, etc.

Burroughs writes clean prose that is easy going down and surprisingly modern in its smooth, no-frills style. John Carter arrives there fully clothed!

The Red Race also prefer revealing attire! John Carter spends an inordinately long and tiresome period of time in Frontier America that is nonsensical and bored me to near-sleep.

Green Men are monstrous humanoids. View all 23 comments. Transcript from the John Carter sessions from the files of Dr.

Doctor: We were talking about representations of things that are ideals for you, and how they are expressed in imaginative fantasies.

Carter: What was that? Doctor: sighs You were telling me about Barsoom and your adventures there. Carter: Yeah I traveled there, you know?

It's Mars, actually. Doctor: How did you know it was Mars? Carter: There's no other explanation Did you know they discovered an 8th and 9th ray there?

Doctor: And what range of wavelengths along the continuous spectra of electromagnetic radiation would they associate with those rays?

Carter: Hmmm I think it was 8 and Doctor: Is Violet important? Associated with a female name, perhaps? Carter: No, I told you the woman's name is Dejah Thoris.

I am her betrothed. But it's a tragic love story, and here I am back on Earth She is my princess Dejah Thoris, and I am her greatest warrior.

Doctor: Anagrammatic for "other jihads"? Carter: No other woman came close to her perfection. I have never seen a finer example of womanhood.

Doctor: I seem to recall you saying that she was hatched from an egg. If I may speak abreast of certain delicate issues, was she lacking any particular physical attributes common to women?

Carter: thinks for a moment She can not tell a lie And she lives with honor in everything she does. Doctor: The unattainable finally achieved, and then irrevocably torn asunder.

But tell me more about your heroic feats - you described your physical prowess as being somewhat godlike.

Carter: On Earth, I'm just an exemplary soldier. It's due to my many years of experience in fighting. But on Mars, I am the finest fighting specimen around.

I think it's due to the weaker gravity and thinner atmosphere, but I can jump higher and move more quickly than the native inhabitants.

Doctor: Your glories epitomize physical perfection. Are there other, similarly awesome qualities you embody? Carter: Well I'd like to say I'm smarter too, but I tend to act first and think later.

If only I'd remembered sooner about view spoiler [the nine tones hide spoiler ] But I don't want to talk about that. Doctor: I think our time is up.

We've accomplished a lot. Please be sure to pay the receptionist on the way out. Yes, cash is preferred. Carter: Ok.. Doctor: And don't forget to put on some clothes I tolerate it during these sessions, but you really can't go around everywhere on the planet unclothed, you know.

People will begin to think you're crazy View 2 comments. Mar 20, Werner rated it liked it Recommends it for: Fans of action-oriented science-fiction.

Shelves: classics , science-fiction. It can be said at the outset that Burroughs was not a very deep nor a very disciplined writer.

His disdain for research often shows in his work, and it does here; and in his science fiction he would write voluminously in this genre --this novel sparked a series, and he produced two other popular sci-fi series as well consistent and well-thought world building wasn't his strength.

For instance, his Martian children incubate in eggs and hatch only when they're able to eat solid food --but his Ma It can be said at the outset that Burroughs was not a very deep nor a very disciplined writer.

For instance, his Martian children incubate in eggs and hatch only when they're able to eat solid food --but his Martian women have physiques like those of human women, busts and all.

If there were ever a writer who overused coincidence in plotting, it would be Burroughs, and his plot developments and devices can strain credibility; science fiction writers of that day were quite taken with astral projection, but John Carter's ability to, in effect, simply will himself to the Red Planet, as a means of space travel, is definitely a stretch.

For all that, though, his work continues to fascinate readers. Partly, this is because of the enduring appeal of his theme of "primitivism" or "feralism," of which Tarzan, of course, is the archetypal example, but which constantly reappears in his work: the saga of a scion of modern high- tech, regimented civilization, transported to a primitive, dangerous world where he can be free to be his own boss, but must meet physical challenges in order to survive.

And his heroes earn our respect, because they're not egoistic brutes who revel in a chance to be predators in a jungle; rather, John Carter and the others are instinctively moral men who model what Burrough's generation thought of as "masculine virtues" which actually aren't gender-specific!

Of course, they're also larger-than-life heroes with strength, ingenuity, and competence. This gives his work a dimension of meaning, both as an implicit criticism of a stultifying and constraining social order that tries to reduce us to cogs in a constantly smooth-running machine and as a positive endorsement of qualities we recognize as worth honoring and imitating, that still resonates with readers today, and I think always will.

He's also a master of pacing, and of exciting adventure that can keep you turning the pages; and the broad canvas of his picture of Mars --an arid, dying world balkanized among a plethora of warring tribes and kingdoms, violently struggling for survival-- has an undeniable imaginative power that grips the reader.

Jan 06, Owlseyes rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi , us-lit. He ventured far and wide in the realm of imagination.

Maybe he "caught" kids and teens first, then adults, definitely. I was one of the "caught-ups" in this vast world imagined, when I was a teen; I read Tarzan whenever possible and all the pulp fiction I could grab.

I agree in some way, for a certain genre of writing. The Barsoom world which this novel of John Carter adventures on Mars is a part of started before Tarzan.

The 1st version was called Under the moons of Mars; later then it became A princess of Mars, published in The business of writing saved him.

He had started at He acknowledged: his earlier career had been disappointing. APoM struck me first for its introductory lines.

John Carter the civil war hero the one we all love, writes the narrator,…grey eyes , black-hair…a typical southern gentleman , finds himself looking for gold in the Arizona landscape.

Then females, 10 to 12 feet tall. A population with curious statistics: of years of average life,they can live up to years, only 1 in dies of disease.

Carter's only friends are Martian Sola a "motherly" young woman of 45 , a loyal watch "dog"…and surely the girl, the loved princess, Dejah Thoris.

A race of brutes. Five million Martians. Even Martians are astounded. And more. The two Martian moons are closer than ours; so nights are different; if both moons visible, than light, Nights are cold on Mars.

So much has been written on these stories of Burroughs; from so many angles…. I think you can read politics in to Burroughs. His aim will always go far beyond that; because imagination needs no politics.

When I was a kid,my eyes didn't read politics; I was mesmerized, The series was also inspirational for many scientists in the fields of space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life, including Carl Sagan , who read A Princess of Mars when he was a child.

John Carter , a Confederate veteran of the American Civil War , goes prospecting in Arizona immediately after the war's end. Having struck a rich vein of gold, he runs afoul of the Apaches.

While attempting to evade pursuit by hiding in a sacred cave, he is mysteriously transported to Mars , called " Barsoom " by its inhabitants.

Carter finds that he has great strength and superhuman agility in this new environment as a result of its lesser gravity and lower atmospheric pressure.

He soon falls in with a nomadic tribe of Green Martians, or Tharks, as the planet's warlike, six-limbed, green-skinned inhabitants are known.

Thanks to his strength and martial prowess, Carter rises to a high position in the tribe and earns the respect and eventually the friendship of Tars Tarkas , one of the Thark chiefs.

The red Martians inhabit a loose network of city-states and control the desert planet's canals , along which its agriculture is concentrated.

Carter rescues Dejah Thoris from the green men in a bid to return her to her people. Subsequently, Carter becomes embroiled in the political affairs of both the red and green Martians in his efforts to safeguard Dejah Thoris, eventually leading a horde of Tharks against the city-state of Zodanga, the historic enemy of Helium.

Winning Dejah Thoris' heart, he becomes Prince of Helium, and the two live happily together for nine years.

However, the sudden breakdown of the Atmosphere Plant that sustains the planet's waning air supply endangers all life on Barsoom.

In a desperate attempt to save the planet's inhabitants, Carter uses a secret telepathic code to enter the factory, bringing an engineer along who can restore its functionality.

Carter then succumbs to asphyxiation, only to awaken back on Earth , left to wonder what has become of Barsoom and his beloved.

Burroughs began work on A Princess of Mars in the summer of when he was Despite failure in his business affairs, he had accumulated a wealth of unusual experiences from working a variety of jobs which had brought him into contact with miners, soldiers, cowboys, and Native Americans.

While writing A Princess of Mars , Burroughs initiated what soon became a regular writing tool: maintaining worksheets relating to the piece he was completing.

The sheets included start and end dates of writing, titles of chapters, and characters. He was apprehensive about revealing what he was working on, and told only his wife that he was doing so.

He still hoped to find business success, and thought the tale to be indicative of a childish nature, and so outlandish that potential business contacts would think him ungrounded if they discovered what he was working on.

At this point he had already decided to adopt the pen name of "Normal Bean", an attempt to suggest that despite the incredible nature of his story, he was still a sane, reliable character.

Before completing the novel, he considered options for publishing, and realized he knew little about this world or how to submit a story.

Because he liked and was familiar with The All-Story magazine, he submitted 43, words to the editor under the title "Dejah Thoris, Martian Princess.

The Managing Editor of the magazine, Thomas Newell Metcalf, wrote back on August 24, , to offer some criticisms of the pacing and focus of the tale, and suggested omitting the chapter "Sola Tells Me Her Story" it was restored in the novel ; he suggested that if Burroughs could finish the novel at under 70, words, he Metcalf would consider publishing it.

However, when the first part of the serialization appeared in the February edition of The All-Story , it bore the title " Under the Moons of Mars ".

For the publication of the serial, Burroughs used the pen name "Normal Bean", which he selected as a pun to stress that he was in his right mind, as he feared ridicule for writing such a fantastic story.

The effect was spoiled by a typesetter who interpreted "Normal" as a typographical error and changed it to "Norman.

By , Burroughs had become very popular with the reading public, and A. Schoonover, who carefully read the descriptive passages on the costumes and weapons of Barsoom and developed an overall concept for the artwork, even ensuring that John's Carter's pistol and belt in his cover illustration reflected their origins in Green Martian craftsmanship.

A Princess of Mars was one of the few works for which Burroughs, in his inexperience as a new writer, relinquished all serialization rights.

While the novel is often classed as science fantasy , it also belongs to the subgenre of planetary romance , which has affinities with fantasy [16] and sword and sorcery ; it is distinguished by its inclusion of scientific or pseudo-scientific elements.

Spacecraft may appear, but are usually not central to the story; this is a key difference from space opera , in which spacecraft are usually key to the narrative.

While there are earlier examples of this genre, A Princess of Mars and its sequels are the best known, and they were a dominant influence on subsequent authors.

Initially published in magazines with general readership, by the s the planetary romance had become very popular in the emerging science fiction pulp magazines.

The novel can also be classified as the closely related genre sword and planet , which consists of what are essentially sword and sorcery stories that take place on another planet.

A Princess of Mars is widely considered to be the archetypal novel of the sword and planet genre. The novel also shares a number of elements of Westerns , such as desert settings, women taken captive, and a climactic life-or-death confrontation with the antagonist.

Burroughs employs a literary device for A Princess of Mars to which he returned in several sequels—introducing the novel as though it were a factual account passed on to him personally.

In this case he frames John Carter as an avuncular figure known to his family who has given him the manuscript earlier, and instructed him not to publish it for 21 years.

A Princess of Mars is similar to many of Burroughs' tales. Characterized by copious violent action, it is basically a travelogue , a tale of a journey and various encounters on that journey, which does not necessarily have a defined plot.

It is also a captivity narrative , involving a civilized hero being captured by an uncivilized culture and being forced to adapt to the primitive nature of the captors to survive.

As is the case with the majority of the Barsoom novels to follow, it portrays a hero facing impossible odds and forced to fight a range of lurid creatures in order to win the love of the heroine.

The tale portrays a hero with a sense of honor transcending race and politics.

Mit letzter Kraft fliegt er click here Fabrik und kann die Tore öffnen. Running Man. Unterwegs begegnet der Trupp please click for source Luftflotte der roten Marsmenschen, die bis auf die Hautfarbe den irdischen Menschen gleichen. Da erinnert sich John Carter daran, dass er ja die Farbkombination kennt, mit der man die Tore der Fabrik Bound Im Netz Begierde kann. Deutscher Titel.

Princess Of Mars Video

A Princess of Mars, Part One Princess Of Mars Then, there are some elements that might stand up rather. The series was also inspirational for many scientists in the fields of space exploration and the search for extraterrestrial life, including Carl Saganwho read A Princess learn more here Mars when he was a child. Carter: No other woman came close to her perfection. This book is an amazing combination of really awesome science fiction and Victorian novel. I came to this having enjoyed the terribly-named Princess Of Mars click here much more than I had expected. The Princes of Mars in learn more here is a two-dimensional creation: in love with John Carter except for those predictable moments when predictable misunderstandings occur, a Red Princess of the city-state Helium, beautiful, haughty, brave, a woman of her word, etc. TT had put a guard dog actually a Shetland-size, many-tusked critter called a calot in charge of JC. I dunno, but maybe! The style of Burroughs' adventure writing has always appealed to me and his stories create a living world without devolving into anthropological essay. When a solider in the middle east gets here in the line of duty, he is teleported to the planet Barsoom.

Princess Of Mars - Streams und Mediatheken

Chacko Vadaketh. Mit bisher drei Übersetzungen ist dies der bis heute meistpublizierte Marsroman des Autors in Deutschland. Trending: Meist diskutierte Filme. Dann fällt er in Ohnmacht. Sie gehört der humanoiden Marsrasse des Planeten an.

So for, I would have been squarely between 3 stars and 4 stars. So what brings the book down to 2. I see this as a fundamental flaw because it meant that all of the wonderful, larger-than-life descriptions of Carter had to come from, uh, his own mouth.

However that may be, I have never regretted that cowardice is not optional for me. It just made me want to scream at him: Now I had no problem with the sentiment expressed by the above quotes as all of them are classic pulp hero language.

I just found it to be the wrong style for this over the top hero tale and it hurt my head to have to listen to him explain his ultimate badassery while trying to avoid sounding completely pompous.

Thus, I like the story concept and the world building and even teh character of John Carter. View all 64 comments. Apr 02, Will Byrnes rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction , fantasy.

Some years back David Bowie asked the musical question, "Is there life on Mars? Not with a girl, well, there were one or two cracks opened in that young heart, but we do not speak of that now but with reading.

And the brazen hussy that led me down that path was none other than Edgar Rice Burroughs. Of course there were others, all vying for my immature attention, Arthur C.

Clarke, Isaac Asimov, H. Wells, Robert Heinlein, Jules Verne, and plenty more from that gang of idiots. I remember the glee I felt when a parcel would arrive, the soft packaging that sprinkled to the floor if you opened the pull-tag a little too energetically.

Lift the treasure to your nose and inhale deeply. No, wiseass, no glue involved. No glue actually needed. Paperbacks, Ace and Ballantine mostly.

This was the way I got one of my first scents of the lifetime of reading that awaited. It was intoxicating. Prime among the treasures to be found in those bags were the Barsoom novels of ERB.

I followed the adventures of John Carter the way readers of a certain detective followed his exploits in issues of The Strand. Reading ERB as a kid was one of the best things about being a kid.

So one might imagine the anticipation bubbling up when I learned that a film was in the offing. Good, bad or mediocre, this was must-see territory.

And to prepare it seemed that, fifty years after having first encountered Barsoom through books, it was worth giving at least some of the books a second look.

He is trapped in a cave by hostile forces, when he wishes himself, pretty much, to Mars, the god of his profession.

The film of course had to come up with a better excuse than that. He is taken prisoner by a group of Tharks, a race of six-limbed, twelve-to-fifteen foot tall green warriors think taller, thinner, ancestors of Klingons , led by one of their less bloodthirsty sorts, a fellow named Tars Tarkas.

Tarkas and Carter find common cause eventually and thus begins a beautiful friendship. TT had put a guard dog actually a Shetland-size, many-tusked critter called a calot in charge of JC.

Can the girl be far behind? Not a chance. Woola - from the film. What a cutie! After the Tharkian horde does battle with a race of human-like sorts, they take a prisoner, a female.

The film pads her resume with some science credits Having established his warrior cred by kicking several Tharkian butts, JC has some wiggle room among Thark society and manages to learn a fair bit.

He is, naturally, curious about the new resident. Lynn Collins as Dejah Thoris - from the film Oh, there is one other item missing from the checklist, the baddie.

Well, there are several, a crude Thark leader, monsters aplenty, but most of all a professional sneak-thief-liar-betrayer of a Thark named Sarkoja, who does all she can to foil TT and JC in whatever they might want to do.

All she lacks is a broom and some striped socks. Sweden will not be calling any time soon. Carter finds himself in a seemingly endless series of battles, large and small.

People are captured. People fight. People flee. Friends help friends. Baddies behave badly. No one really changes much.

Oh, they rise in rank and esteem, and prove their mettle, and some character is revealed in time, but really, nothing is told about these people that we did not know very early on.

There is silliness and many shortcuts are taken. ERB makes use of deus ex machina so much he must have had a mechanic on call.

Carter learns that a large amount of Martian communications occurs via telepathy and bingo, he is telepathic too. What luck! Also, Martian language has devolved to mostly a single tongue.

No, really. And he learns it in a twinkling, with the help of a kindly female Thark named Sola. Whenever someone needs a rescue there is always a rescuer, either now or eventually.

The cavalry comes riding over the hill a bit too often to avoid eye-rolling. The fights are pretty much pro-forma, with almost mandatory nods to the honor and skill of the thousands of opponents, after, of course, Carter knocks them out or kills them with a single blow to the chin.

In between, Burroughs offers bits and pieces of his vision of life on Mars. We learn how Thark children are joined with parents, get some info on Barsoomian visions of death and afterlife, consider a bit the problem of scarce air, and may wonder at the ancient human ruins now occupied by other species.

They have some nifty tech on Barsoom as well, having discovered a special 9th ray of light that is used for energy.

Radium is a useful power source as well. Airships of all sizes speed about, but seem to function mostly as boats with negative draft.

There will be swashbuckling. There are some elements in the book that do not travel well through the years. The women have some wonderful qualities but there is little e-quality to be found.

Also, slavery is still a very active element of Martian society, and while ERB shows sundry characters shackled to those chains, and does his best to free those, he does not seem all that upset about the institution.

In one commentary on communistic elements of Tharkian society, ERB notes Owning everything in common, even to your women and children, has resulted in your owning nothing in common.

This was published in , so a quote like this might not have stuck out so much back then. Of course there are many much more ancient items that seem quaint today, such as You shall not covet your neighbor's wife, or his manservant, or his maidservant, or his ox, or his ass, or anything that is your neighbor's.

I guess ownership is in the eye of the beholder. Social systems seem to be widely of the royal persuasion, although combat figures large in determining leadership in some groups.

And just as girls have been led to hope for a prince to come to the rescue, so here our hero is not panting after any ordinary female.

Dejah is a bona fide , card-carrying princess. Then, there are some elements that might stand up rather well. Carter applies his knowledge of animals to persuade the locals to treat their beasties much better.

The moral superiority of races is not at all determined by color, or in this case, even sentient species. Honesty, motherhood, and I am certain that if the ingredients grew there, apple pie would come in for some ERB support.

Courage is also a highly valued trait. Physical prowess in battle is paramount here. Frank Schoonover's cover illustration for the first book version-from Wikipedia Ok, so bottom line.

This is a very dated book. It is, after all, one hundred years old. It contains antiquated, sometimes offensive notions.

Many of the characters are pretty thinly drawn. But this was not intended to be a thoughtful, adult novel. It is pulp fiction, literally, as Barsoom made its first public appearance in All-Story Magazine in , and its focus is on three things, action, action and action.

Overall, good fun. It helps to be a ten-year-old boy. Look at those cavemen go. Put those binoculars away NOW.

Coverage in the latest issue includes a whole passel of things Martian. View all 50 comments. Mar 25, Lyn rated it liked it.

A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs was not the book that transformed Burroughs into a publishing success, that honor belongs to Tarzan of the Apes.

However, this was the book, published in that effectively began a career that would change the face of American literature in various genres from then on.

The stamp of Burroughs influence can be seen in the works of Heinlein, Clarke, Bradbury and countless others as well as film and television.

Flash Gordon used the Barsoom series as a template and Star Wars was heavily influenced in turn by the Flash Gordon serial. From the humble origins of pulp magazines came a rich series of adventure, romance and swashbuckling good fun.

This is the story of how John Carter was mysteriously transported to Mars and how he then engaged in one superhuman adventure after another.

Not much message or provocative literature here, just a well written good narrative. View all 21 comments. Aug 08, Evgeny rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy.

The books is full of familiar cliches: it created most of them. I am also having a great trouble between classifying this book between fantasy and scifi.

As I am not the only one with such problem a new genre was created dubbed "sword and planet".

Coming back to the plot, an American Civil War veteran and a perfect southern gentleman he calls himself thus, so who am I to call him differently?

John Carter ended up on Mars, of all places - straight from an Arizona desert, minus all his cloths. P The books is full of familiar cliches: it created most of them.

Practically upon his arrival he became a prisoner of large war-loving Martians. Being best at everything he puts his mind to, he beat one of the most obnoxious aliens and gained some measure of respect.

Numerous adventures including romantic ones follow. Speaking about romance I kept recalling an old saying "If you must fall in love, fall in love with a queen" - because this is exactly what John Carted did see the title.

I told you, the guy was perfect. This thing - him being perfect - is the only significant complaint I can make. At least when it comes to him being stronger than larger Martians there was an explanation scientific enough for me to accept: the difference in gravitational fields between good old Earth and red Mars means earthlings must have stronger bones and muscles.

The writing quality is mostly very good, the story is never boring. This is the second best known series of the King of Pulp Fiction; the best known series of him is so famous the main character grew out of his books to live an independent life.

I am talking about Tarzan obviously. So this is a classic book, it passed a test of time, is still very entertaining and very influential.

Four stars despite my grumblings above. Please ignore recent pitiful attempt by Disney to make a movie out of it. They failed miserably.

View all 12 comments. Old-school pulpy goodness. Fun classic full of manly adventures and good cheesy romance between an awesomely manly man John Carter did I mention manly?

And let's not forget John Carter's favorite Barsoomian "dog" Woola. Who in my head, thanks to the otherwise forgettable movie, will always look like this insanely adorable menacing monster-cutie - SQ Old-school pulpy goodness.

What's not to love about Burroughs' classic? Well, yeah, it's chock-full of machismo, with a generous helping of sexism, a touch of colonialism attitude, a bit of stereotyping, and with mostly wooden characters Doesn't it sound awful?

I kid, I kid, Barsoom fans. I actually enjoyed this book, believe it or not. I mean, we get a dying red planet, an atmosphere plant!

A Princess of Mars may not always appeal to the modern reader thanks to changing values in the last hundred years!

Burroughs' portrayal of Mars Barsoom is pretty awesome, the adventures are fun, and the pacing is good.

Ahhhh, John Carter Your story may be neither deep nor profound, but it's an entertaining classic, and I still love you. View all 41 comments.

Jun 17, Jason Koivu rated it it was ok Shelves: fiction , sci-fi. I'm not saying I didn't like it, but what in the hell was that?!

A Princess of Mars is a forerunner in the sci-fi genre and as many of them suffer from ignorant science, so suffers this one.

Modes of transportation are silly, alien races are simplistic at best, etc etc I know I'm nitpicking. On the other hand, one has to be impressed with the guesswork a fictional novelist made regarding living conditions on another planet I'm not saying I didn't like it, but what in the hell was that?!

On the other hand, one has to be impressed with the guesswork a fictional novelist made regarding living conditions on another planet, considering he was writing at a time prior to space exploration.

Hell, this was written a mere nine years after the first flight by man. The real reason this didn't resonate with me had to do with the story's hero, John Carter.

He's just too good at everything to be interesting. The writing also suffers from stiff formality. The rigidity of the language Burroughs' used lacked elegance and deflated exciting action scenes.

However, there was plenty of action and that alone kept me turning pages. All the same, the errors mounted. Burroughs made the mistake of giving the game away.

Use of the diary style of narration is a technique in fiction that should never have happened. If the hero of the story is writing about his adventures ten, twenty, whatever number of years after it all went down, it completely gives away the fact that he lived to tell the tale and thus takes the wind out of tension's sails.

Present tense for action, always present tense! John Carter arrives there nekkid! John Carter is transported to Barsoom from Frontier America directly after a bloody conflict with the dread and savage Red Man in this case, the Apache Green Men do not believe in love or friendship or marriage or parenthood.

The Princes of Mars in question is a two-dimensional creation: in love with John Carter except for those predictable moments when predictable misunderstandings occur, a Red Princess of the city-state Helium, beautiful, haughty, brave, a woman of her word, etc, etc.

Burroughs writes clean prose that is easy going down and surprisingly modern in its smooth, no-frills style. John Carter arrives there fully clothed!

The Red Race also prefer revealing attire! John Carter spends an inordinately long and tiresome period of time in Frontier America that is nonsensical and bored me to near-sleep.

Green Men are monstrous humanoids. View all 23 comments. Transcript from the John Carter sessions from the files of Dr.

Doctor: We were talking about representations of things that are ideals for you, and how they are expressed in imaginative fantasies.

Carter: What was that? Doctor: sighs You were telling me about Barsoom and your adventures there. Carter: Yeah I traveled there, you know?

It's Mars, actually. Doctor: How did you know it was Mars? Carter: There's no other explanation Did you know they discovered an 8th and 9th ray there?

Doctor: And what range of wavelengths along the continuous spectra of electromagnetic radiation would they associate with those rays?

Carter: Hmmm I think it was 8 and Doctor: Is Violet important? Associated with a female name, perhaps?

Carter: No, I told you the woman's name is Dejah Thoris. I am her betrothed. But it's a tragic love story, and here I am back on Earth She is my princess Dejah Thoris, and I am her greatest warrior.

Doctor: Anagrammatic for "other jihads"? Carter: No other woman came close to her perfection. I have never seen a finer example of womanhood.

Doctor: I seem to recall you saying that she was hatched from an egg. If I may speak abreast of certain delicate issues, was she lacking any particular physical attributes common to women?

Carter: thinks for a moment She can not tell a lie And she lives with honor in everything she does. Doctor: The unattainable finally achieved, and then irrevocably torn asunder.

But tell me more about your heroic feats - you described your physical prowess as being somewhat godlike. Carter: On Earth, I'm just an exemplary soldier.

It's due to my many years of experience in fighting. But on Mars, I am the finest fighting specimen around. I think it's due to the weaker gravity and thinner atmosphere, but I can jump higher and move more quickly than the native inhabitants.

Doctor: Your glories epitomize physical perfection. Are there other, similarly awesome qualities you embody? Carter: Well I'd like to say I'm smarter too, but I tend to act first and think later.

If only I'd remembered sooner about view spoiler [the nine tones hide spoiler ] But I don't want to talk about that.

Doctor: I think our time is up. We've accomplished a lot. Please be sure to pay the receptionist on the way out.

Yes, cash is preferred. Carter: Ok.. Doctor: And don't forget to put on some clothes I tolerate it during these sessions, but you really can't go around everywhere on the planet unclothed, you know.

People will begin to think you're crazy View 2 comments. Mar 20, Werner rated it liked it Recommends it for: Fans of action-oriented science-fiction.

Shelves: classics , science-fiction. It can be said at the outset that Burroughs was not a very deep nor a very disciplined writer.

His disdain for research often shows in his work, and it does here; and in his science fiction he would write voluminously in this genre --this novel sparked a series, and he produced two other popular sci-fi series as well consistent and well-thought world building wasn't his strength.

For instance, his Martian children incubate in eggs and hatch only when they're able to eat solid food --but his Ma It can be said at the outset that Burroughs was not a very deep nor a very disciplined writer.

For instance, his Martian children incubate in eggs and hatch only when they're able to eat solid food --but his Martian women have physiques like those of human women, busts and all.

If there were ever a writer who overused coincidence in plotting, it would be Burroughs, and his plot developments and devices can strain credibility; science fiction writers of that day were quite taken with astral projection, but John Carter's ability to, in effect, simply will himself to the Red Planet, as a means of space travel, is definitely a stretch.

For all that, though, his work continues to fascinate readers. Partly, this is because of the enduring appeal of his theme of "primitivism" or "feralism," of which Tarzan, of course, is the archetypal example, but which constantly reappears in his work: the saga of a scion of modern high- tech, regimented civilization, transported to a primitive, dangerous world where he can be free to be his own boss, but must meet physical challenges in order to survive.

And his heroes earn our respect, because they're not egoistic brutes who revel in a chance to be predators in a jungle; rather, John Carter and the others are instinctively moral men who model what Burrough's generation thought of as "masculine virtues" which actually aren't gender-specific!

Of course, they're also larger-than-life heroes with strength, ingenuity, and competence. This gives his work a dimension of meaning, both as an implicit criticism of a stultifying and constraining social order that tries to reduce us to cogs in a constantly smooth-running machine and as a positive endorsement of qualities we recognize as worth honoring and imitating, that still resonates with readers today, and I think always will.

He's also a master of pacing, and of exciting adventure that can keep you turning the pages; and the broad canvas of his picture of Mars --an arid, dying world balkanized among a plethora of warring tribes and kingdoms, violently struggling for survival-- has an undeniable imaginative power that grips the reader.

Jan 06, Owlseyes rated it really liked it Shelves: sci-fi , us-lit. He ventured far and wide in the realm of imagination.

Maybe he "caught" kids and teens first, then adults, definitely. I was one of the "caught-ups" in this vast world imagined, when I was a teen; I read Tarzan whenever possible and all the pulp fiction I could grab.

I agree in some way, for a certain genre of writing. The Barsoom world which this novel of John Carter adventures on Mars is a part of started before Tarzan.

The 1st version was called Under the moons of Mars; later then it became A princess of Mars, published in The business of writing saved him.

He had started at He acknowledged: his earlier career had been disappointing. APoM struck me first for its introductory lines. John Carter the civil war hero the one we all love, writes the narrator,…grey eyes , black-hair…a typical southern gentleman , finds himself looking for gold in the Arizona landscape.

Then females, 10 to 12 feet tall. A population with curious statistics: of years of average life,they can live up to years, only 1 in dies of disease.

Carter's only friends are Martian Sola a "motherly" young woman of 45 , a loyal watch "dog"…and surely the girl, the loved princess, Dejah Thoris.

A race of brutes. Five million Martians. Even Martians are astounded. And more. The two Martian moons are closer than ours; so nights are different; if both moons visible, than light, Nights are cold on Mars.

So much has been written on these stories of Burroughs; from so many angles…. I think you can read politics in to Burroughs.

His aim will always go far beyond that; because imagination needs no politics. When I was a kid,my eyes didn't read politics; I was mesmerized, Forever young, View all 5 comments.

This reminded me of 'Flash Gordon conquers the universe' and similar shows that I used to watch on TV on Saturday mornings as a child, presumably the people who made such films grew up reading stories like this.

In the same way as those shows, although they had rocket ships apparently powered by sparklers ,they also featured magic amulets and spells.

This isn't so much science fiction as fantastic fiction which is sciency in that the action takes place on Mars but the hero gets there and back a This reminded me of 'Flash Gordon conquers the universe' and similar shows that I used to watch on TV on Saturday mornings as a child, presumably the people who made such films grew up reading stories like this.

This isn't so much science fiction as fantastic fiction which is sciency in that the action takes place on Mars but the hero gets there and back apparently by magic rather than by some ostensibly rational means.

The plot is essentially Androcles and the lion, repeated with many variations, with the hero, Confederate veteran Captain John Carter of Virginia as Androcles and various creatures taking the part of the lion.

Finding himself naked and on Mars John Carter finds he has superhuman powers in the lower gravity of Mars, he can jump great heights and a blow from his fist can have fatal effects.

I wondered at first if this was some kind of 'Lost Cause' parable - you know, the South was only beaten by the North in the American Civil War because it was an unfair fight - why in the lower gravity conditions of Mars it would have been an entirely different story.

But as the pages slipped by I abandoned that theory, this book instead is a fruit of that cultural period when the Civil war had been resolved in favour of the cultural victory of the South, the south is genteel, it is chivalric and honourable, it's heroes are knights.

Burroughs' John Carter is essentially Ivanhoe on Mars but with access to rifles with effective ranges of hundreds of miles and exploding radium bullets though sadly these don't make much impact plot-wise view spoiler [ if you can forgive the pun hide spoiler ] and of course the ability to jump over any foe or low building, deadly fists and telepathy.

All Martians apparently are telepathic and John Carter gains this ability but Martians can't read his thoughts conveniently Burroughs isn't the kind of writer to trouble to take this entirely seriously view spoiler [ or possibly even to remember consistently that his hero is telepathic hide spoiler ] but luckily he can always overhear that bad guys are planning on ambushing him in case he has turned off the reception of telepathic thoughts for the afternoon to get some peace and quiet , and he never uses his telepathic abilities on the Martian Princess he falls in love with - but of course, he's a Southern gentleman from Virginia, how vile of me even to imagine he might do such a thing, naturally he prefers interplanetary cultural misunderstandings to cloud their relationship instead.

The storyline is full of bizarre holes, but sadly one doesn't sense enough tongue in cheek for this to be consistently funny though I was amused that telepathy works on dead people too and so when John Carter murders in a sword fight four of his fellow guardsmen in a convoluted attempt to rescue the above Princess, a psychologist is sent to investigate the crime and profiles the killer from the minds of the victims - a handy skill.

It is the sciency elements which I found most interesting, Burroughs' Mars is Earth like but dying - it is drying out and losing it's atmosphere, agriculture of a kind is possible along the infamous canals, and in another H.

Wells touch Burroughs is interested in evolution and long periods of history - his Martians are mostly inhabiting the ruins of some long vanished civilisation from the good old days when the planet was far wetter.

Of modern Martians there are two types, green and red, the latter are humanish , the former are physically alien but behave a bit like plains Indians but with radium bullets and long ranged rifles to allow them to offset the fighting power of the Red Martians in their airships which don't explode when hit by explosive radium bullets, but never mind.

In addition to all Martians being telepathic and oviparous, the green Martians have lost through evolution kindness and any gentle or merciful feelings.

John Carter then is a double throwback, a knight of the South with genteel manners who helps those weaker than himself except when he kills them and this gives him an advantage, repeatedly, as I said Androcles and the Lion.

Ideologically the story shows the triumph of very old fashioned values, coupled with pure fighting ability over the whole of Mars despite it's flying machines, hyper violence, long range rifles and factory to manufacture an atmosphere.

Implicitly one doesn't need technology or factories or democracy view spoiler [ on Mars there are chieftain societies and monarchies with airships hide spoiler ] just pure emotion, a powerful punch and to do the right thing.

First Spain, next the universe, the American century has begun. In terms of science fiction this is a beautiful exemplar of the tendency for that genre to be historical fiction in space - the Fall of the Roman empire with spaceships in Foundation or space Feudalism in Dune coupled with interest in hereditary and evolution, the twist here is that apparently you can become too evolved rather like Wells' Morlocks and Eloi - the ancestor is a perfect balance of both tendencies, the over specialisation of the descendants can become a weakness leading to vulnerability in the face of John Carter's avenging fist.

We might also see here a stage in the development of a peculiar stage in popular heroism, thoughtlessness married with violence that we as consumers accept as good because of the self-image of the hero as essentially chivalric and a 'gentleman', from a critical view point we might see this as the off duty KKK man out of his bed sheets who is kind to animals, or the morality of a Nathan Bedford Forrest - superheroes all seem to me to be of the same type.

The implicit message is that someone else will sort out the mess the 'collateral damage' that they have caused in pursuit of their own interests.

So such Realpolitik, the victory of the stronger over the strong. View all 8 comments. Sep 07, Richard Derus rated it liked it.

The Movie Review : Seriously, what was all the butt-hurt over this movie about? Yeah, the title stank. Shoulda called it Barsoom and had done with it.

The hunky young actor who played John Carter wasn't likely to get an Academy nod. Dejah-Thoris was mildly pretty. It was perfectly acceptable summer-afternoon watching.

It was perfectly acceptable summer-afternoon reading. Why did this flop? I am not understand, please. To take pity, please, on old immigrant from country of dead peoples and to explain?

View all 11 comments. Mar 01, Markus rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy , classics. It's hard to classify this book, both in terms of genre and quality.

There is no doubt that Burroughs is an important, influential and remarkably talented writer the writing itself is extraordinarily good sometimes , and overall, this is a book that I am very glad that I read.

On the other hand, it has not aged well. While it contains many fun and interesting elements, it has been so widely surpassed in almost every single area by all the brilliant masterpieces of fantasy and science fiction tha It's hard to classify this book, both in terms of genre and quality.

While it contains many fun and interesting elements, it has been so widely surpassed in almost every single area by all the brilliant masterpieces of fantasy and science fiction that have followed it in the century since its release.

That is quite natural, and not really something the book itself can be blamed for. In the end, I suppose it makes the most sense to call it a fun and simple space fantasy that is quite often extremely enjoyable, and another interesting case study of the early era of many genre tropes.

Jan 08, Matthew rated it really liked it Shelves: audio , , classic , library , sci-fi. Maybe even 4. This must have been very creative for the time it was written.

View all 10 comments. Jun 08, Megan Baxter rated it liked it. I came to this having enjoyed the terribly-named movie version much more than I had expected.

Not deep, but pulpy fun. Seriously, John Carter? I didn't know how much of the book had made it into the movie, but I was hoping for some of the same kind of pulpy fun from this.

Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement I came to this having enjoyed the terribly-named movie version much more than I had expected.

Note: The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here.

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Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. When a solider in the middle east gets wounded in the line of duty, he is teleported to the planet Barsoom.

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Princess Of Mars Filme wie Princess of Mars

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